Blood Moon visible during the nights from Wednesday, May 25th to the 27th

On the night of May 25-27, observers in Oceania, Hawaii, eastern Asia and Antarctica will see a lunar eclipse that coincides with the moon’s closest approach to Earth — making it a “supermoon” eclipse that will turn the moon reddish — also known as a “blood moon.” (The dates of this eclipse span two days because the area it will be visible spans the international date line).

The eclipse starts at 4:47:39 a.m. EDT (08:47:39 GMT), according to NASA’s Eclipse Page. That’s when the moon touches the penumbra. The partial phase of the eclipse starts about 57 minutes later, at 5:44 a.m. EDT (09:44:57 GMT). The moon enters the total phase of the eclipse at 7:11:25 EDT (11:11:25 GMT) and completes exiting the umbra at 10:52:22 EDT (12:52:22 GMT). Last contact is at 13:49:41. (To convert from GMT to your time zone you can use this converter). To read more about this event click here.